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3 Christmas Songs You Rarely Get to Hear

December 6, 2009

I don’t mind the fact that some radio stations play holiday music 24/7 before Christmas Day.  Sometimes, on the way home from the office, it’s just what I’m in the mood for.  What DOES drive me crazy about this practice, though, is hearing the same song TWICE within 10 minutes…different artist or not.  I feel like Vince Vaughn in FRED CLAUS (which is fast becoming a favorite Christmas movie of mine), who has to keep hearing “Here Comes Santa Claus” while helping the Bg Guy with the Naughty files…it becomes mental torture, and/or cruelty.  So here are three songs the stations could add to their holiday playlists…that is if the media corporations that own these stations can take their lips off Madison Avenue’s ass long enough to pay attention to them.

OLD TOY TRAINS (Roger Miller, 1967).  Let’s start with an absolute beauty.  I am a fan of Roger Miller’s music.  He’s by turns trippy, funny, and poetically stunning.  This song fits the last category.  It’s quite simply a lullaby sung by a father (or mother, if you hear a female vocalist sing this) in which the parent describes quite simply that Santa Claus is on his way to a little boy’s home, and that the boy should get to bed.  The chorus alternates with a simple verse in which the boy is told to just keep his eyes closed and listen for Santa’s sleigh bells.  I really can’t do this gem justice. You have to hear it for yourself.

HAPPY NEW YEAR (ABBA, 1979-I think!).  ABBA has always been a great group for telling stories in their songs.  In this holiday gem, a woman (par for the course for this group, but who’s complaining?) proposes a toast to her lover as the first day of a new decade begins.  It’s a song of optimism, in which we are encouraged to hold on to our dreams, keep having visions, and stick to them, otherwise, what’s the point of living?  It’s not the usual romance ballad, but rather a wish for all humanity to move forward.  Madison Avenue would probably argue that the reference to 1989 dates the song, and that’s why you don’t hear it.  I say, Madison Avenue is afraid too many people will take the positive message of the song to heart, and it’s game over for them and their stranglehold on our society.

A WINTER’S TALE (David Essex, 1982-again , I think)  This song, written by Tim Rice and Mike Batt, on the other hand, is  a stark contrast to the first two.  This is no romantic ballad, nor cheery, upbeat, jingle.  This is a heart breaking song about a man who has just broken up with the woman of his dreams as the year ends-ouch!  What I admire about the song is that in the second verse, he wishes the woman happiness and love, a painfully noble thing to do…I don’t know if I’d ever have the strength to do that myself.  Then again, I’ve never been lucky enough to even HAVE a romantic involvement with a potential Miss Right.  Seriously, though, I think there are people out there who can relate to the situation, and maybe ease their pain with this song.  At least, that is what I would hope they would do.

So people, if you love these songs like I do, then call your radio stations and HOUND them to get these songs on the air, and don’t take NO for an answer  Nobody wants to go off the deep end like Fred Claus did.

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